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SOLDIER HEALTH AND
MEDICAL READINESS

ARMYCONNECT™ AKO OFFLINE MEDICAL READINESS

NOTE: ArmyConnect™ welcomes you to your Soldier Health and Medical Readiness dashboard. There is only one thing you need to do between now and 01 October 2023: download and save your medical readiness data to a consolidated PDF or store in CCD format (XML) for uploading into a personal health record (PHR). Click here for instructions on how to save your Health Record data.

– ArmyConnect™ Staff –

SOLDIER HEALTH AND MEDICAL READINESS

Per the Army’s Office of the Surgeon General, “Medical Readiness allows the Army to mobilize Soldiers and meet the Army mission. Every Soldier is responsible for their medical readiness and must remain dedicated and resilient.” Pay attention to your health, take initiative, and protect those around you. For those of you who serve in harms way; being a Soldier is a contact sport. The Army’s soldier health and medical readiness is typically an afterthought, and yet it remains vital to your well-being at all times.

Do not become a Command and Staff PowerPoint casualty, be proactive, think ahead and remember that your readiness and the care of your subordinates is a leader’s responsibility. Use the Army Holistic Health and Fitness program for inspiration.

Remember your Periodic Health Assessment (PHA) helps review your soldier health which determines your readiness. You can start Phase I online and schedule Phase II with your PCM.

EFFECTIVE MARCH 1, 2023: Quality, Timeliness, Customer Service (QTC) will replace Logistics Health Incorporated (LHI) as the vendor for the Reserve Health Readiness Program. Please let us know if the process and customer service has improved.

Army TRICARE AND MEDICAL Links

Links to official Army and DoD websites that you need to maintain individual and family medical readiness across the force.

Army Individual Medical Readiness

You are responsible for ensuring you are ready to complete your assigned duties and tasks. DoD Instruction 1332.45 states that all soldiers, medical providers, and leaders must address any Individual Medical Readiness (IMR) deficiencies to ensure you are medically fit. IMR represents the foundation for a unit’s medical readiness and determines deployability. Army personnel readiness relies heavily on medical readiness, which directly impacts the Army’s mission. A lack of medical readiness is one of the primary reasons for soldiers becoming non-deployable. IMR information is entered into e-Profile or MEDPROS by your healthcare and administrative providers.

Below is a short list of your annual responsibilities:

  • Periodic Health Assessment (PHA) (required by DoD annually)
  • DL conditions (required by DoD)
  • DRC (required by DoD)
  • Immunization status (required by DoD)
  • HIV test and DNA specimen (required by DoD)
  • Individual medical equipment (required by DoD to include medical dog tags)
  • Hearing readiness (Army-specific requirement)
  • Vision readiness (Army-specific requirement to include mask inserts, two pairs of glasses, and goggle/eye pro inserts)

While each unit and chain-of-command has their own system, do not fall victim to the typical PowerPoint spotlight or doom (your name is on a slide in a red box which is typically not good).

Leaders, empower your junior leaders to have a vested interest in their soldier health and medical readiness. Company command teams should look to platoon leadership (in most formations) to identify and resolve potential readiness issues through proactive discussions and activities. Company training meetings become the forum to relay the information to command team. The command team then relays this information to the battalion staff to ‘balance the books’. This is a good example of bottom-up refinement and employing leaders to focus on the whole soldier concept and not just when told. Birth month audits at the company level (or PCS date) are recommended as this is a memorable window for most soldiers.

Take care of yourself, take care of each other.


Periodic Health Assessment for USAREC / USACC

This service is great for soldiers serving in USACC or USAREC and away from a military installation.

Typically you must be further than You can do your Periodic Health Assessment Phase II via the Virtually Integrated Patient Readiness and Remote Care (VIPRR) Clinic. If you are in USACC and must conduct your Phase II in person, schedule your appointment at the beginning or end of your Advanced Camp rotation at Fort Knox. Or, if you are attending a school, schedule it on the tail end of that course (i.e. Common Faculty Development – Instructor Course (CFD-IC), Master Educator Course (MEC), or University Senior Leader Course (USLC)).

The us army MEDICAL HEALTH SYSTEM (MHS) GENESIS

Your medical readiness comes in all forms and you need to maintain your documentation at all times; always work backwards from the VA physical. MHS GENESIS is the new electronic health record for the Military Health System (MHS). The system provides an enhanced experience to manage your health information. MHS GENESIS is the “new hotness” that integrates inpatient and outpatient solutions that will improve communication of medical and dental information. From point-of-injury to point-of-care, the goal is to help you and your treatment facility have a clearer understanding of your medical needs.

Army Solder Health and Medical Readiness Deployment

Army Medical Readiness FAQs

Your medical readiness comes in all forms and you need to maintain your documentation at all times; always work backwards from the VA physical. MHS GENESIS is the new electronic health record for the Military Health System (MHS). The system provides an enhanced experience to manage your health information. MHS GENESIS is the “new hotness” that integrates inpatient and outpatient solutions that will improve communication of medical and dental information. From point-of-injury to point-of-care, the goal is to help you and your treatment facility have a clearer understanding of your medical needs.

No matter your medical status, the Army, and in turn, senior leaders, need to understand the deployability status of all members in the unit. Below are the most common IMR categories:

  • Fully Medically Ready (FMR): In short, fully deployable or deployable with limitations. This status includes any condition or profile that is correctable or complete within 30 days.
  • Partially Medically Ready (PMR): Per DoDI 6025.19, “A category for Service members who are overdue for a DoD PHA, classified as DRC 4, or who lack one or more of the following: required immunizations, medical readiness laboratory studies, or individual medical equipment”
  • Not Medically Ready (NMR): Per DoDI 6025.19, any “deployment-limiting medical condition (DLMC) which is categorized as “temporary non-deployable” or “permanent non-deployable” for medical reasons or if they require urgent or emergency dental treatment (classified as DRC 3).”

A DRC is short for the Army Dental Readiness Code. There are four classes or categories?

  • Class 1 (DRC 1): “Service members are considered DRC 1 when they have a current dental readiness assessment and do not require dental treatment or re-evaluation.”
  • Class 2 (DRC 2): “Service members are considered DRC 2 when they have a current dental readiness assessment and require non-urgent dental treatment or re-evaluation for oral or dental conditions that are unlikely to result in dental emergencies “within 12 months.
  • Class 3 (DRC 3): “Service members are considered DRC 3 when they require resolution of an urgent or emergent dental treatment to be FMR. Service members classified as DRC 3 will be categorized as “temporary non-deployable” until the condition is resolved.”
  • Class 4 (DRC 4): “Service members are considered DRC 4 when they are overdue for their annual dental readiness assessment. DRC 4 Service members are considered PMR and will require their annual dental readiness assessment immediately upon being identified as FMR if no other IMR deficits exist.”

The deployment-limiting medical condition (DLMC) is a medical category. When the Army determines you are “temporary non-deployable” or “permanent non-deployable” for medical reasons in accordance with DoDI 1332.45 and/or if they require urgent or emergency dental treatment (classified as DRC 3).

Your unit healthcare provider or Physician’s Assistant (PA) will work with local Medical Treatment Facility (MTF) staff to determine your medical readiness. Once decided, you are assigned an MRC.

Per DA PAM 40–502, dated 27 June 2019, there are four (4) Medical Readiness Classifications or Codes.

  • Medical readiness class 1 – fully medically ready and includes temporary profiles ≤ 7 days
  • Medical readiness class 2 – partially medically ready and includes temporary profiles between 8 and 30 days and other conditions that are quickly correctable
  • Medical readiness class 3 – not medically ready and includes temporary profiles > 30 days and other conditions
  • Medical readiness class 4 – medical readiness indeterminate.

The Army has seven (7) deployment-limiting codes that include, but not limited to, the following:

  • DL 1: Temporary profile > 30 days
  • DL 2: Dental readiness class 3
  • DL 3: Pregnancy and postpartum
  • DL 4: Permanent profile indicating MOS Administrative Retention Review Program (MAR2) needed1
  • DL 5: Permanent profile indicating Medical Evaluation Board (MEB) needed2
  • DL 6: Permanent profile indicating non-duty related action is needed
  • DL 7: Permanent profiles with a deployment/assignment restriction code (F, V, or X)
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